10 Activities To Try Before Summer Ends

friends hanging out at the beach at sunset

Anyone else feel like they blinked and summer was over? Especially August — where did the month go?!

Well, we’re not quite ready to let summer slip by yet. Even if you were knee-deep in work or other entanglements this summer, there’s still time to catch up on some fun seasonal activities. Depending where you live, the fall months offer some of that summer heat (and less crowds, we might add) that can fuel your summertime fantasies. So don’t whip out those cozy sweaters and pumpkin spice lattes just yet! Here are 10 easy, family-friendly activities you can do before fall sets in.

  1. Roast marshmallows over the fire

Camping not required. Anywhere bonfires are allowed works! Heck, you can even roast marshmallows over a gas range stove if you really don’t want to leave the house. Roasting marshmallows is the ultimate summer activity for cozy nights, so whether you’re watching a movie inside or exploring the great outdoors, it never hurts to include some s’mores in your plans.

Person holding up a smorePhoto by Kenrick Mills

  1. Lounge by the pool

Haven’t had a day to lounge by the pool yet? Grab your favorite book and head to your nearest swimming pool. While it might be getting a little chilly in some areas for swimming, you can still soak up the last bits of sun poolside (and hopefully with a margarita in hand).

  1. Get those day trips in

If your summer was too packed for a vacation, day trips are a perfect remedy. Get up early, gas up, and explore your surroundings. Revisit a favorite spot or pick a place you’ve never been before!

  1. Make your own ice cream

Summer isn’t complete without plenty of ice cream. Some say it tastes even sweeter if you make it yourself. Ever tried? You don’t need a fancy ice cream maker to do this at home — you just need a couple of ingredients and a plastic baggie to get started! (Hint: top with fresh berries for the ultimate homemade ice cream experience).

  1. Take a short camping trip

Who doesn’t love sleeping under the stars? Grab a tent and head out into the wild. (If you prefer a more elevated experience, try renting an RV or a yurt to hunker down in). Camping doesn’t need to be a huge production; if you’re feeling pressed for time, try searching for local campgrounds and spending only one night. You won’t need to pack as much gear and you won’t have to go very far.

Woman reading in her tentPhoto by Lê Tân

  1. Create a scavenger hunt outside

This is a perfect activity for kiddos who aren’t ready to see summer go. Head to your local park, trail, or even your backyard and let them hunt down their treasures. (The end of summer is a great time for this, because you can ask them to identify the things you can see during the summer, but not in the fall or winter!)

  1. Try a new sport or physical activity

Ever wanted to look as cool as the kids rollerblading on TikTok? Well, you’ve still got time. Try picking up a new physical activity, whether it’s finally getting that pair of skates or simply jogging in a new part of town.

  1. Make bead jewelry and friendship bracelets

Ah, the classic summer camp activity. 90s nostalgia is all the rage right now, anyway, so why not go all out? Grab beads, lanyards, the whole gambit, and see what cute accessories you can create. Or snag a ticket to one of our candle making workshops!

  1. Tell spooky stories in the dark

While we’re pretending we’re still at summer camp...how about some good old-fashioned scary stories? This is best done around a fire, but a flashlight in a dark room works just as well.

  1. Enjoy the longer days while you still can!

The days are getting shorter and shorter. Before we know it, it’ll start getting dark at 5 p.m. again. Take evening walks, chase sunsets, and soak it all in while you can!

What’s on your last-minute summer bucket list? Let us know in the comments!

Cecilia Seiter
Cecilia is a freelance writer and contributor to Slow North. She writes largely about sustainability, especially as it applies to beauty, wellness, and the future of technology. She is a graduate of the journalism department at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and is based in Los Angeles, CA.